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A view of the bar at Liberati Osteria & Oenobeers with a view of the wood bar and a line of brown chairs along it. A waiter with his back turned as he walks away is also visible.
Liberati Osteria & Oenobeers
Ryan Dearth/Eater

Where to Eat Around Five Points

This historic neighborhood is home to both long-running and exciting new establishments

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Liberati Osteria & Oenobeers
| Ryan Dearth/Eater

Often referred to as the “Harlem of the West,” Five Points in its heyday hosted the likes of Billie Holiday and Ella Fitzgerald and was fondly remembered by Jack Kerouac. Nowadays, this enclave’s northwest border has been rebranded as trendy RiNo. But farther inside the old district, Five Points retains much of its character in the face of redevelopment.

Even the hot new eateries — Rebel Bread, Kuni Sushi, Habit Carbon — pay homage to their local history. From weathered establishments holding strong against gentrification to new and forward-thinking endeavors, here are 14 places to dine and drink around the neighborhood.

Have another favorite Five Points spot? Send us a tip.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

The British Bulldog

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The British Bulldog is where soccer fanatics come to gather. Streaming soccer and rugby matches from across the pond, this sports bar welcomes fans as early as 7 a.m. They cheers to every goal scored with local and imported beers, and sober up with pub grub like wings and burgers.

Mercury Cafe

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Playing host to poetry slams, swing dancing, and even opera, Mercury Cafe embraces the eclectic. But beyond the neon-colored, themed rooms and rotating door of events, the cafe serves as a solid option to cure hunger at any time of the day. From brunchy egg omelets to Colorado sourced chicken and fish for dinner, the organic menu also has plenty of vegetarian and vegan options. 

Mercury Cafe [official]

La Fiesta

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Serving the area since 1964, La Fiesta is a family-owned favorite. Housed in a former Safeway, the massive restaurant serves up large platters of burritos, chiles rellenos, Mexican hamburgers, and enchiladas smothered in red or green chile. 

La Fiesta [official]

Liberati Osteria & Oenobeers

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Right on the cusp of Five Points, there’s now fresh pasta, cured meats, Italian breads and pastries, and oenobeers all under one roof. What are oenobeers? A new hybrid brewed with grapes in addition to grains, yeast, hops, and water. Hop lovers should try the dry-hopped IPA brewed with sauvignon blanc grapes. And the port-heavy Oximonstrum with Nebbiolo and Barbera is the perfect way to end a meal (plus a scoop of gelato for good measure). 

Ryan Dearth/Eater

TeaLee's Teahouse

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Moving to the “the rhythm of tea,” a visit to TeaLee’s Tea House & Bookstore encourages patrons to slow down and sit a spell. Bottomless pots of tea and afternoon high tea with sandwiches are available — with the option to spike your tea with tea-infused spirits — plus a quaint menu of soups, quiches, and various pastries. 

TeaLee’s [official]

Coffee at The Point

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Nearing a decade of service on the corner of 26th and Welton, Coffee at The Point is a haven among java lovers and the local community. Integrated within the historical district, the coffee shop hosts a number of events including book clubs and writer’s groups, while also functioning as a calm retreat to get some work done. A.M. warriors can energize with Coda Coffee and a selection of breakfast sammies. By afternoon, find hot and cold sandwiches, salads, local beers, and wine glasses.

Coffee at the Point/Facebook

715 Club

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A former dive from the 1940s, the 715 Club has been resurrected three decades after its closure. With cheap local brews and spirits and themed nights centered around spinning vinyl and Wu-Tang, the new iteration has definitely morphed into a hipster paradise come Friday and Saturday evenings. However, 715 retains much of its former self, including the original front signage. 

715 Club Ryan Dearth/Eater

Famous Original J's Pizza

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Steadily becoming its own slice of New York — in part thanks to Rosenberg’s Bagel & Delicatessen around the corner — Famous Original J’s tackles another facet of classic East Coast eats: the coveted NY pizza. Introduced as a walk-up counter for midnight revelers, the pizzeria recently expanded its hours to serve rectangular “grandma-style” pizzas, regular pies, and individual slices sprinkled with the likes of Taylor ham (or Taylor Pork Roll, depending on where you’re from) with an earlier crowd. 

Famous Original J’s [official]

The Rolling Pin Bakeshop

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Crusty loaves of freshly baked bread, croissants stuffed with ham and gruyére and apricot almond, and desserts like eclairs and layered cakes — this European-styled bakery never looked so good. Diners can grab a pastry and espresso to go or snag a chair and admire the collection of rolling pins on the wall. 

Rolling Pin/Facebook

Rosenberg's Bagels & Delicatessen

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Raised in the burbs of New York, Joshua Pollack is serious about his bagels. That much is made clear at his original Denver deli. Coloradans and transplant East Coasters alike looking for their carb fix find it here; Rosenberg’s recreates the chewy bagels revered across New York and New Jersey. Topped with house-cured lox, gravlax, pastrami, or just a healthy amount of cream cheese, they draw a serious crowd no matter what time of day. 

Rosenberg’s/Facebook

Welton St. Cafe Home of Mona's

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Welton Street Cafe is one of the oldest souls still residing in Five Points, and for good reason. Thanks to the Dickerson family, this little spot is a base for home-cooked anything and everything, from smoked collards and black-eyed peas to fried catfish, perch, or whiting. Kicked with a bit of Caribbean flair, jerked meats can be found here by the plate or cooked into pies. But the crowning achievement is the perfectly crisped fried chicken accompanied by white bread slices to eat and to, well, use as a napkin. 

Goed Zuur

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Goed Zuur is Denver’s only beer bar dedicated to everything sour, wild, and tart, across two dozen taps and more than 100 bottles. But most recently, the bar added a nominal selection of non-acidic brews, and even wine and liquor, to please all drinkers. Continental snacks and small plates like a full-on butter flight with French bread can be paired, or ask for the secret-ish menu of ramen — served only on Sundays — swimming in a broth made up of leftover charcuterie.

Goed Zuur/Facebook

Birdcall

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Solving the problem of staffing in the restaurant industry, as well as diners who needn’t be bothered by humans, is the tech-driven restaurant Birdcall. Trading out wait staff for kiosks, hungry patrons who hate socializing only need to tap and swipe through a number of fried chicken sandwiches — including crispy chicken with pimento cheese and Nashville-hot birds — along with salads, and a few side dishes. After checking out, diners sit tight and watch the order countdown on the big screen.

Birdcall/Facebook

Dunbar Kitchen & Tap House

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Filling the niche for a casual neighborhood bar comes Dunbar Kitchen & Tap House. Subbing out subpar bar snacks, Dunbar nails it when it comes to down-home eats. Some of the Southern staples are buttermilk-brined birds and shrimp po’ boys on challah bread, paired with a beer on tap or local spirit (straight) poured behind the reclaimed bar. 

Dunbar/Facebook

The British Bulldog

The British Bulldog is where soccer fanatics come to gather. Streaming soccer and rugby matches from across the pond, this sports bar welcomes fans as early as 7 a.m. They cheers to every goal scored with local and imported beers, and sober up with pub grub like wings and burgers.

Mercury Cafe

Mercury Cafe [official]

Playing host to poetry slams, swing dancing, and even opera, Mercury Cafe embraces the eclectic. But beyond the neon-colored, themed rooms and rotating door of events, the cafe serves as a solid option to cure hunger at any time of the day. From brunchy egg omelets to Colorado sourced chicken and fish for dinner, the organic menu also has plenty of vegetarian and vegan options. 

Mercury Cafe [official]

La Fiesta

La Fiesta [official]

Serving the area since 1964, La Fiesta is a family-owned favorite. Housed in a former Safeway, the massive restaurant serves up large platters of burritos, chiles rellenos, Mexican hamburgers, and enchiladas smothered in red or green chile. 

La Fiesta [official]

Liberati Osteria & Oenobeers

Ryan Dearth/Eater

Right on the cusp of Five Points, there’s now fresh pasta, cured meats, Italian breads and pastries, and oenobeers all under one roof. What are oenobeers? A new hybrid brewed with grapes in addition to grains, yeast, hops, and water. Hop lovers should try the dry-hopped IPA brewed with sauvignon blanc grapes. And the port-heavy Oximonstrum with Nebbiolo and Barbera is the perfect way to end a meal (plus a scoop of gelato for good measure). 

Ryan Dearth/Eater

TeaLee's Teahouse

TeaLee’s [official]

Moving to the “the rhythm of tea,” a visit to TeaLee’s Tea House & Bookstore encourages patrons to slow down and sit a spell. Bottomless pots of tea and afternoon high tea with sandwiches are available — with the option to spike your tea with tea-infused spirits — plus a quaint menu of soups, quiches, and various pastries. 

TeaLee’s [official]

Coffee at The Point

Coffee at the Point/Facebook

Nearing a decade of service on the corner of 26th and Welton, Coffee at The Point is a haven among java lovers and the local community. Integrated within the historical district, the coffee shop hosts a number of events including book clubs and writer’s groups, while also functioning as a calm retreat to get some work done. A.M. warriors can energize with Coda Coffee and a selection of breakfast sammies. By afternoon, find hot and cold sandwiches, salads, local beers, and wine glasses.

Coffee at the Point/Facebook

715 Club

715 Club Ryan Dearth/Eater

A former dive from the 1940s, the 715 Club has been resurrected three decades after its closure. With cheap local brews and spirits and themed nights centered around spinning vinyl and Wu-Tang, the new iteration has definitely morphed into a hipster paradise come Friday and Saturday evenings. However, 715 retains much of its former self, including the original front signage. 

715 Club Ryan Dearth/Eater

Famous Original J's Pizza

Famous Original J’s [official]

Steadily becoming its own slice of New York — in part thanks to Rosenberg’s Bagel & Delicatessen around the corner — Famous Original J’s tackles another facet of classic East Coast eats: the coveted NY pizza. Introduced as a walk-up counter for midnight revelers, the pizzeria recently expanded its hours to serve rectangular “grandma-style” pizzas, regular pies, and individual slices sprinkled with the likes of Taylor ham (or Taylor Pork Roll, depending on where you’re from) with an earlier crowd. 

Famous Original J’s [official]

The Rolling Pin Bakeshop

Rolling Pin/Facebook

Crusty loaves of freshly baked bread, croissants stuffed with ham and gruyére and apricot almond, and desserts like eclairs and layered cakes — this European-styled bakery never looked so good. Diners can grab a pastry and espresso to go or snag a chair and admire the collection of rolling pins on the wall. 

Rolling Pin/Facebook

Rosenberg's Bagels & Delicatessen

Rosenberg’s/Facebook

Raised in the burbs of New York, Joshua Pollack is serious about his bagels. That much is made clear at his original Denver deli. Coloradans and transplant East Coasters alike looking for their carb fix find it here; Rosenberg’s recreates the chewy bagels revered across New York and New Jersey. Topped with house-cured lox, gravlax, pastrami, or just a healthy amount of cream cheese, they draw a serious crowd no matter what time of day. 

Rosenberg’s/Facebook

Welton St. Cafe Home of Mona's

Welton Street Cafe is one of the oldest souls still residing in Five Points, and for good reason. Thanks to the Dickerson family, this little spot is a base for home-cooked anything and everything, from smoked collards and black-eyed peas to fried catfish, perch, or whiting. Kicked with a bit of Caribbean flair, jerked meats can be found here by the plate or cooked into pies. But the crowning achievement is the perfectly crisped fried chicken accompanied by white bread slices to eat and to, well, use as a napkin. 

Goed Zuur

Goed Zuur/Facebook

Goed Zuur is Denver’s only beer bar dedicated to everything sour, wild, and tart, across two dozen taps and more than 100 bottles. But most recently, the bar added a nominal selection of non-acidic brews, and even wine and liquor, to please all drinkers. Continental snacks and small plates like a full-on butter flight with French bread can be paired, or ask for the secret-ish menu of ramen — served only on Sundays — swimming in a broth made up of leftover charcuterie.

Goed Zuur/Facebook

Birdcall

Birdcall/Facebook

Solving the problem of staffing in the restaurant industry, as well as diners who needn’t be bothered by humans, is the tech-driven restaurant Birdcall. Trading out wait staff for kiosks, hungry patrons who hate socializing only need to tap and swipe through a number of fried chicken sandwiches — including crispy chicken with pimento cheese and Nashville-hot birds — along with salads, and a few side dishes. After checking out, diners sit tight and watch the order countdown on the big screen.

Birdcall/Facebook

Dunbar Kitchen & Tap House

Dunbar/Facebook

Filling the niche for a casual neighborhood bar comes Dunbar Kitchen & Tap House. Subbing out subpar bar snacks, Dunbar nails it when it comes to down-home eats. Some of the Southern staples are buttermilk-brined birds and shrimp po’ boys on challah bread, paired with a beer on tap or local spirit (straight) poured behind the reclaimed bar. 

Dunbar/Facebook

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